Ombre

11/28/2010

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Several days ago I read an article about celebrities with ombre hair. I looked at myself in the mirror and realized I haven't dyed my hair in several weeks. I guess now I have the hottest hair color due to laziness...
The cheapest semi-precious stone comes in chips in assorted colors and sizes and are often used in "boho" jewelry instead of more refined jewelry.  I think an ombre pattern is one way to make these agate chips into something more polished looking.

First sort the stones into several different piles according to color.
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Take a head pin, string the darkest stones first, then gradually string the lighter ones (use 5-10 stones per pin). Make a loop with the last 1/4 inch of wire. 
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Finally take a length of chain with large links, attach stone pins onto every other link.
 
 
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(Not exactly crafty per se)
This particular kind of erasers (rubbers if you are in the UK) are made by this Japanese company called Iwako. They are not very good for erasing, but I think they are great for making into decorations.

To put a loop on it, simply poke a deep hole with a thick needle first, then insert a loop pin.
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I noticed it says "SWEET CORN" on the cone...

 
 
Gourmet enthusiasts/ food snobs will insist that caviar may never be eaten with silver utensils because silver will react with the delicate berries and make the caviar taste...metallic. Therefore a piece of rather obscure flatware called caviar spoon is created especially for serving caviar. Caviar spoons are usually made from mother of pearl shells. They are not terribly expensive to buy online, but alternatively you can eat some mussels:
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...and carve them into spoons. Mussel shells are extremely easy to carve with a Dremmel tool.
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To make some non-perishable (and much cheaper) caviar, all you need are round beads, preferably semi-opaque stone or glass beads, glued onto the spoon. I then glued a pin back onto the back of the spoon to make a caviar pin.

If you are not a fan of power tools, you can use a whole shell (I used an oyster shell here) to make a caviar dish (again with stone "caviar"). The scallion is made from thin strips cut from a Garnier Fructis shampoo bottle.
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I always find eyes intriguing, I guess that's why they say eyes are called windows to the soul. Eyes can be very creepy at the same time because they indicate something is alive and it is aware of your presence. The blinking eye in the opening sequence of The Twilight Zone used to give me goosebumps even when the opening tone (opening music?) didn't.

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I found the photo of this necklace made from old glass prosthetic eyes. With a little digging I found that most vintage glass eyes were made in Germany, and those eyes are often very well-made enough to be almost indistinguishable from real eyes.

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To make your own version, you can get these plastic doll eyes from eBay, they are much cheaper than real vintage glass eyes (This is not my hand). First gather some red fibers from something like a red sweater.  I use a bottle of slightly old (therefore slightly yellow) clear nail polish and brush a thick layer on to the eyeballs. Right after the nail polish become tacky but before it dries completely, stick the red fibers onto the eyeball. Apply a few at first and find an image of a real eyeball as a reference. Notice there are usually more blood vessels near the edge of the eyeball and around the iris, and make sure they are generally in a radio pattern. After the nail polish dries, apply a few more layer.

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This is what it looks like after the final layer of nail polish dried. I wish the iris could look more realistic, but I haven't found a good way to fix that yet.